Scientific Research

STUDY OF THE SLACK

by Stop Plastic Pollution

Waste collection by the sea :

From the big dune ( lat. : 50.794020, long. : 1.606489)
To the mouth of the Slack ( lat. : 50.804270, long. : 1.602234)

Distance : 1000 meters 
FRANCE

During his daily run on the beach between the " Pointe aux Oies" and Ambleteuse, Steve Stievenart, plastic artist, discovered an English television washed in by the sea. This as the trigger for the study that he will conduct by himself over 1km stretch of beach for 2 months, 2 hours per day, or 120 hours of collection. Using a cart with low pressure tires manufactured specifically to roll on sand, he will collect all kinds of objects that he will sort and inventory in this workshop.

He has been surprised to discover plastic bottles from Japan, lighters from China, fish crates from Holland, England ...

However, the explanation for these multiple sources is simple : More than 400 commercial ships of all nationalities ( besides cruise ships and fishing boats) cross the strait every day, or nearly 150 000 per year.

Inventory :

Domestic use

More than 700 bottles

More than 400 lighters

1 refrigerator

1 shopping cart

Gas bottles

Toilets

Vacuum cleaner

Leisure activities

2 televisions
1 bike

Beach toys

Industry
More than 80 plastic drums

Toxic products
Building signage
Neon tubes
Engine oil

Industrial grease

From the fishery
More than 500 gloves

More than 120 crates

Traps

Nets
Buoys

Fishing lines

Pharmaceuticals

Syringes

Infusions

Drugs

Pregnancy tests

Tampons

Better medical treatments through new advances  

The foundation has set itself the objective of working together with researchers all over the world in order to discover new medical compounds in the marine environment and develop the medicines of tomorrow.

The foundation plans to work together with young scientists, who will go out into field to study pollution at selected sites where specific issues have been identified.

Their mission will be to develop conservation programmes over the short term in the most urgent cases, and environmental protection programmes over the medium term.

In general terms, however, and due to the gravity of the situation, there is no longer any time left to waste with respect to capitalising on the energy, abilities and knowledge available.